Exploring Characterization in “Raymond’s Run” with Playlist Stations

After our reading of "Raymond's Run", I wanted to find a way to engage students in thinking about character that would also get them up and moving since they had been sitting and doing some quiet thinking/reading work for a few days.  I decided to craft a new playlist station activity with a focus on … Continue reading Exploring Characterization in “Raymond’s Run” with Playlist Stations

Putting Students in the Driver’s Seat: Read Aloud Reading Partners

Reading partners is not a new concept; many literacy experts have written about this concept and offered best practices for implementing them into classroom life, including Smokey Daniels.  Though I don't implement them as much as I'd like to or probably should, I do love watching students in action when time and opportunity present themselves … Continue reading Putting Students in the Driver’s Seat: Read Aloud Reading Partners

Immersing Ourselves in Poems with a POETRY FLOOD

Last Wednesday and Thursday, my students engaged in a "poetry flood", a gallery walk designed to give students to immerse themselves in 50 different poems.  The activity design was fairly simple:  I chose close to 50 unique poems of varying styles, poets, topics, and time periods for students to browse and read.  During the poetry … Continue reading Immersing Ourselves in Poems with a POETRY FLOOD

Next Steps for Thinking About Theme, Central Topics, and Social Issues: Pop-Up Book Club Meetings

In my last post, I shared how we used a Lucy Calkins learning structure to think about more deeply about theme, central ideas/topics, and social issues.  Yesterday, I did two variations on some "pop-up" book club meetings to help students think through these elements. Variation #1, Periods 1 and 4 On Monday evening,  I compiled … Continue reading Next Steps for Thinking About Theme, Central Topics, and Social Issues: Pop-Up Book Club Meetings

Looking for Seeds of Theme, Central Ideas, and Social Issues in Our Nonfiction Books: Scaffolding, Structure, and Strategy

This past Friday and Monday (April 12 and 15), I wanted my students to have an opportunity to think a little more deeply about their nonfiction books.  Using a focal point from one of our Lucy Calkins units of study, I crafted a graphic organizer to help students identify each of the following elements in … Continue reading Looking for Seeds of Theme, Central Ideas, and Social Issues in Our Nonfiction Books: Scaffolding, Structure, and Strategy

Navigating Our Nonfiction Books with Notice and Note Signposts

As you read in my last blog post, my students have started reading their self-selected nonfiction books.  Our first in-class reading day was last Thursday, April 11.    To help my students jump into their books with some purposeful annotation that would not overwhelm them, we reviewed both the Notice and Note nonfiction signposts as … Continue reading Navigating Our Nonfiction Books with Notice and Note Signposts

Nonfiction Book Tasting + Google Forms

We are rapidly coming down the home stretch with only six weeks left in the school year!  We returned from our spring break last week with a two-day book tasting of six nonfiction books, selections we made as a grade level based on the Lucy Calkins nonfiction and literary nonfiction units of study: March Forward, … Continue reading Nonfiction Book Tasting + Google Forms

Give Them Something to Talk About: Book, Head, Heart Reflections + ConverSTATIONS

A few weeks ago my students completed a Book, Head, Heart set of reflections as a formative assessment and reflection for their day of in-class reading of their choice library books. I borrowed this strategy from Bob Probst and Kylene Beers; you can read more about BHH in their book Disrupting Thinking.   Once they completed composing … Continue reading Give Them Something to Talk About: Book, Head, Heart Reflections + ConverSTATIONS

Personalizing Goals for Outside of School Reading Time

  Last semester we tried as a grade level to require students to read a uniform number of minutes outside of school time.  I really wanted to stay away from reading logs or anything like that, so I provided my students a calendar to keep in their literacy notebooks to track their minutes.  Unfortunately, the … Continue reading Personalizing Goals for Outside of School Reading Time

Supporting Young Readers: Developing Reading Club Conversation Skills

In my last blog post, I outlined the prep work we did leading up to our "birds of feather" topics reading club meetings to help students dig more deeply into their readings and to come prepared for the reading club discussion. Prior to our club meetings, students brainstormed meeting etiquette and expectations: We also incorporated … Continue reading Supporting Young Readers: Developing Reading Club Conversation Skills