Navigating Our Nonfiction Books with Notice and Note Signposts

As you read in my last blog post, my students have started reading their self-selected nonfiction books.  Our first in-class reading day was last Thursday, April 11.    To help my students jump into their books with some purposeful annotation that would not overwhelm them, we reviewed both the Notice and Note nonfiction signposts as well as the fiction since some students are reading literary nonfiction.  I crafted a double-sided bookmark, and we reviewed each signpost strategy as students added the following shortcut/hashtag annotation codes to use on their “baby” sized sticky notes:

During our class reading time, students were asked to annotate any three signposts they noticed and to flag the sticky note next to the passage where they saw the signpost.  While students could annotate more than three, three was the minimum, and students needed at least three unique signposts.  These signpost annotations have been part of our informal book club meetings today, and it has been interesting to hear students discuss and even debate some of the signpost choices within their groups.  I like this method of integrating the signposts into our active reading work because it is enough to nudge student thinking without overwhelming students with the act of annotation.

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